Register knowledge

Access to the shared registers

  1. configuration registers, usually being modified via “read – modify – write”.
    • use mutex to protect the register access.
    • use irqspin lock, if the registers are being accessed by ISR handler.
    • NOTE: the if condition needs to be mutex/spinlock protected too, in the this example: if(!*IPU_CONF & (1 << 3)) *IPU_CONF |= (1 << 3);
  2.  status registers
    • “write 1 to clear” register
      • if the “write” operation is atomic, no protection is needed; otherwise, protect it.
      • however, if you perform a “read & write”, you need protect the entire ‘read-write” sequence.
    • “read to clear” register
      • protect doesn’t work in this case.

Register definition

  1. MAP_CONF(x) registers, each register contains one field, for map x only.
    • #define MAP_CONF(x)  (OFFSET + (x) * 4)
      • 0 — 0
      • 1– 4
      • 2– 8
  2. MAP_CONF(x) registers, each register contains two fields: bit 0 ~ 15 for map 0/2/4; bit 16 ~ 31 for map 1/3/5.
    • #define MAP_CONF(x)  (OFFSET + ((x) & ~0x1) * 2) or
    • #define MAP_CONF(x)  (OFFSET + ((x) / 2 ) * 4)
      • 0,1 — 0
      • 2,3– 4
      • 4,5—8
    • write to the correct bit fields
      • shift = (x & 1) * 16;
      • *MAP_CONF(x) |= val << shift;
  3. MAP_CONF(x) registers, each registers contains 3 fields: bit 0 ~ 10 for map 0/3/6; bit 11 ~ 20 for map 1/4/7, bit 21~30 for map 2/5/7.
    • #define MAP_CONF(x) (OFFSET + ((x)/3 * 4)
      • 0,1,2— 0
      • 3,4,5– 4
      • 6,7,8 — 8
    • write the correct bit fields
      • shift = (x%3) * 10;
      • *MAP_CONF(x) |= val << shift;
  4. An complicated example:
    • MAP_CONF(x) contains 6 fields, and defined as (OFFSET + ((x) / 2 ) * 4).
      • 30-26: mapping pointer for map #1 (or 3, 5, 7 when x increases) byte 2 —- 5
      • 25-21: mapping pointer for map #1 (or 3, 5, 7 when x increases) byte 1. —- 4
      • 16-20: mapping pointer for map #1 (or 3, 5, 7 when x increases) byte 0. —- 3
      • 14-10: mapping pointer for map #0 (or 2, 4, 6 when x increases) byte 2  —- 2
      • 9-5:     mapping pointer for map #0 (or 2, 4, 6 when x increases) byte 1. —- 1
      • 4-0:     mapping pointer for map #0 (or 2, 4, 6 when x increases) byte 0  —- 0
    • MAP_VAL(y) contains 4 fields, and defined as (OFFSET + ((y) / 2 ) * 4).
      • 28-24: offset #1 (or 3,5,7,..).
      • 23-16: mask #1
      • 12-8: offset #0 (or 2,4,6…)
      • 7-0:    mask #0
    • For a specified “map” value, e.g. 0, and 1, we want to set:
    • map   byte0         byte1         byte2
    • —————————————————
    • 0         7, 0xFF,  15, 0xFF,     23, 0xFF
    • 1         5, 0xFC,  11, 0xFC,     17, 0xFC
      • the register fields in MAP_CONF(0) will be set to the values, as marked as blue above.
      • for MAP_VAL(x), it will look like this
      •            MAP_VAL(0)      MAP_VAL(1)        MAP_VAL(2)
      • ————————————————————————————————
      • 28-24         15                      5                         17
      • 23-16          0xFF                 0xFC                  0xFC
      • 12-8            7                        23                      11
      • 7-0               0xFF                0xFF                  0xFC
    • the implementation of configure_map(map, offset_b0, mask_b0, offset_b1, mask_b1, offset_b2, mask_b2) would be:
      • shift = (map & 1) * 16;
      • pointer = map * 3;
      • *MAP_CONF(map) |=  ((pointer + 2) << 10 | (pointer +1 ) << 5 | (pointer) <<0 ) << shift;
      • // We need use “pointer”, “pointer + 1”, “pointer + 2” to find the offset of the associated MAP_VAL(y), and the shifts.
        • shift = (pointer & 1) * 16;
        • *MAP_VAL(pointer) |= ((offset_b0 << 8) | (mask_b0 << 0)) << shift;
        • shift = ((pointer +1) & 1) * 16;
        • *MAP_VAL(pointer+1) |= ((offset_b1 << 8) | (mask_b1 << 0)) << shift;
        • shift = ((pointer +2) & 1) * 16;
        • *MAP_VAL(pointer+2) |= ((offset_b2 << 8) | (mask_b2 << 0)) << shift;
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Jaggy artifacts (raw yuv file is important!)

Jaggy arfifacts are introduced by the mismatching between the mismatching of neighbouring pixels. In YUV color space, the focus is on Y component.

Some jaggy artifact is unavoidable. For instance,  when the WEAVE (field combination) deinterlacing is deployed, any change between fields will result “jaggies”, as the pixels in one field do not line up with the pixels in the other.

I met one issue, where UYVY output is good, while YUYV output shows apparent jaggies. First thing coming into my mind is: do the Ys get reversed while being output? Y0U0Y1V1–>Y1UxY0Vx?

The lucky thing is we can route the output to the input interface and capture the raw data to analyse. The raw data clearly shows that Y1,Y3, are not there, but Y0, Y2, are there for twice.

Use a hex editor to open the raw YUV file,

at address 0xC50, uyvy file shows “87 59 7E 5C”; yuyv file shows “59 87 59 7E”.